putthison:

Real People: Dressing Down a Suit

There are no fewer than a thousand guides at this point on how to dress down a suit, but many of them involve doing things that ruin the kind of elegance that make suits attractive in the first place. The best way to dress down a suit, I think, is to do what RT from Copenhagen has done here. 

  • Wear a suit that’s inherently more casual. Textures, colors, and materials will affect how a suit looks. RT’s suit is made from tropical wool (Minnis Fresco, to be exact). Although wool is typically more formal than cotton or linen, the rougher texture and slightly lighter color keep this from looking like the silky, dark business suits you’d wear to boardroom meetings. 
  • Think of the jacket’s details. Here, RT’s jacket has soft, unpadded shoulders, little structure to the chest, and patched, rather than welted, pockets. These can seem like small details, but when added up, they can have a powerful effect.
  • Dial everything else back appropriately. There’s no need to go as far as wearing whimsical socks or bubble vests. You can just dial everything else back a notch or two, so they’re in harmony with your suit. So, instead of a crisp, white shirt — which sometimes can seem a bit formal — try something patterned or light blue. And instead of sleek, formal oxfords, try loafers, derbies, or even chukkas. 
  • Forgo the tie. But if you do, leave the first two buttons of your shirt unfastened, so you get a slightly more attractive collar line, and use a pocket square. 

As for what RT is specifically wearing above, the blue Fresco suit was made for him by Napolisumisura (a bespoke tailoring house that’s touring the US right now, incidentally). The light blue shirt with very fine white stripes is from Vincenzo di Ruggiero. It has a soft, unfused collar, which makes it ideal for casual wear. Finally, the burgundy pocket square with a crosshatching pattern is from Bottega Veneta, the dark brown belt from Edward Green, and the dark brown derbies from Crockett & Jones

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beyondfabric:

My friends Sam Lambert and Shaka Maidoh teamed up with Rule of Three to present a series of short films portraying their interpretations of the sartorial universe.

Known by their unique take on bending and breaking classic menswear rules, each video addresses a specific category of garments and accessories. Watch the full series here.

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iqfashion:

Karl-Edwin Guerre:
“When it comes to style, it’s no different than life; the key is getting to know oneself. It’s about a cycle of stages during which you have opportunities to experiment with cut, fit and color. When that’s said and done, you get to play up your personality because your clothes are essentially a reflection of who you are, and therefore, it demonstrates what rings true for your lifestyle.”
“I have one rule when it comes to selecting my own clothes and accessories: stay true to yourself. The same applies to people that I want to shoot. If there is no specific look that captivates my eye, I make up for it with attitude. I call it a ‘peaceful confidence’. Dressing up/ style is about enhancing the true you, not contriving yourself to a look that doesn’t fit in with your real essence.”
Source: sakspov.com
Photo: vogue.it

iqfashion:

Karl-Edwin Guerre:

“When it comes to style, it’s no different than life; the key is getting to know oneself. It’s about a cycle of stages during which you have opportunities to experiment with cut, fit and color. When that’s said and done, you get to play up your personality because your clothes are essentially a reflection of who you are, and therefore, it demonstrates what rings true for your lifestyle.”

“I have one rule when it comes to selecting my own clothes and accessories: stay true to yourself. The same applies to people that I want to shoot. If there is no specific look that captivates my eye, I make up for it with attitude. I call it a ‘peaceful confidence’. Dressing up/ style is about enhancing the true you, not contriving yourself to a look that doesn’t fit in with your real essence.”

Source: sakspov.com

Photo: vogue.it

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putthison:

Real People: Layering Knitwear
Layering is usually done simple enough: on top of an undershirt goes a long-sleeved woven shirt, then a sweater, then a jacket, and finally – if the weather is freezing – you can add a heavy coat. In the cool temperatures of early spring and late fall, however, you can make a more interesting look by just laying knitwear itself. The principle is the same: the layer closest to your skin should be lightweight, and then on top of that you can add something heavier.
Our own Pete from DC shows how this can be done well. The black sweater is a fisherman’s rollneck by SNS Herning, and the knitted jacket is by Engineered Garments. It’s hard to tell from the photo, but the rollneck is actually knitted with a bobble stitch, which creates a slightly textured surface. A bit like my post on boring outerwear, the use of texturally interesting fabrics here keeps things pleasing without the need to turn to patterns or odd design details. 
The jeans, if you’re wondering, are three-year old APCs, which are valued by many because they fade to that handsome sky blue you see above. The shoes were designed by Supreme in collaboration with Padmore & Barnes – the second of which was the original maker of Clarks’ Wallabees. Padmore & Barnes recently re-launched with a line of Irish made shoes. I admit I wanted to buy some of the boots just so I could say they “had to be, the best thing since my socks in Clarks Wallabees.”

putthison:

Real People: Layering Knitwear

Layering is usually done simple enough: on top of an undershirt goes a long-sleeved woven shirt, then a sweater, then a jacket, and finally – if the weather is freezing – you can add a heavy coat. In the cool temperatures of early spring and late fall, however, you can make a more interesting look by just laying knitwear itself. The principle is the same: the layer closest to your skin should be lightweight, and then on top of that you can add something heavier.

Our own Pete from DC shows how this can be done well. The black sweater is a fisherman’s rollneck by SNS Herning, and the knitted jacket is by Engineered Garments. It’s hard to tell from the photo, but the rollneck is actually knitted with a bobble stitch, which creates a slightly textured surface. A bit like my post on boring outerwear, the use of texturally interesting fabrics here keeps things pleasing without the need to turn to patterns or odd design details. 

The jeans, if you’re wondering, are three-year old APCs, which are valued by many because they fade to that handsome sky blue you see above. The shoes were designed by Supreme in collaboration with Padmore & Barnes – the second of which was the original maker of Clarks’ Wallabees. Padmore & Barnes recently re-launched with a line of Irish made shoes. I admit I wanted to buy some of the boots just so I could say they “had to be, the best thing since my socks in Clarks Wallabees.”

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brokeandbespoke:

Waxed Cotton Navali “Stowaway” Weekender Bag

Some of you might recall that I reviewed a Navali rucksack some time ago, and thought it offered some nice bang for the buck. Not long after that review went live, I was contacted by Navali again to see if I might be interested in reviewing a piece from their waxed cotton line, which they were at the time in the process of getting produced. I agreed, as I thought Navali was really offering some good value canvas and leather bags.

That was months ago, perhaps more than six, but Navali has finally taken shipment of some of their new waxed cotton offerings, as well as some new colorways in the older designs (like this “Helmsman” computer brief in ‘Carafe’ for $89 w/ free shipping). From what I can tell, the quality on these new bags has gone up some as well. The leather is of a noticeably higher quality than that on my original rucksack, and there have been some slight design changes as well, I believe, most notably on this weekender (and the new “Helmsman” bags), the fact that the shoulder strap is now removable.

While I was impressed by the value in Navali’s original offerings, I’m even more impressed with the value now that the quality seems to have been boosted even more. For those who aren’t in the market for a weekender, I think the new waxed cotton “Gunner” briefcase (on sale for $112 w/ free shipping) would be an excellent alternative for someone looking to get a waxed cotton briefcase but didn’t want to spend the money on one from a ‘heritage’ maker. If one doesn’t care much for the appeal of waxed cotton canvas, I’m quite tempted myself to buy the “Helmsman” in ‘Carafe’ I mentioned earlier for $89 (here’s Kiyoshi’s review of the older model), even though I own far too many bags. Navali is currently having a pretty good sale, which brings the bag prices down to those mentioned in this post. If you’re looking for a new bag for travel, school, or work, and you like the rugged aesthetic of thick cotton canvas and leather accents, then definitely check Navali out.

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iqfashion:

Rules of Style - Patrick Grant:
“People are sometimes surprised to see me out of a suit. I want to tell them, I don’t live in a bloody suit! But I have standards. I’m very fastidious about my dress. I feel better when I know the clothes I’m wearing fit right, but if people don’t naturally think about clothes, I don’t want them to worry about clothes. We spend too much time trying to create rules around these things. I’d just like people to wear good things. I don’t want them wearing rubbish made in an awful way.”
“Buy products of genuine lasting value from brands that take their manufacturing seriously. I have things that are 75 years old, like the dinner suit of my grandfather’s that was made in 1933 by a tailor in Edinburgh. Clothes develop stories. You can remember where you’ve been through clothing that you’ve worn. I want products that are going to endure. I hate that we buy things that are disposable. We need to buy products with integrity.”
“Here’s the theory on pattern-on-pattern dressing. Men are likely to wear a pattern in their suit, shirt, tie, and handkerchief, and if all of those are of different scales—the check is a half centimeter, the stripe on the shirt is a centimeter, the stripe on your ties is two centimeters, et cetera—it all works. If the patterns are the same scale, it never works. Look at the Duke of Windsor, who was a great pattern wearer. He never wears the same scale of pattern.”
“I actually don’t care how people dress. I just want people to be interesting.”
Source: details.com
Photo Source: faz.net

iqfashion:

Rules of Style - Patrick Grant:

People are sometimes surprised to see me out of a suit. I want to tell them, I don’t live in a bloody suit! But I have standards. I’m very fastidious about my dress. I feel better when I know the clothes I’m wearing fit right, but if people don’t naturally think about clothes, I don’t want them to worry about clothes. We spend too much time trying to create rules around these things. I’d just like people to wear good things. I don’t want them wearing rubbish made in an awful way.”

Buy products of genuine lasting value from brands that take their manufacturing seriously. I have things that are 75 years old, like the dinner suit of my grandfather’s that was made in 1933 by a tailor in Edinburgh. Clothes develop stories. You can remember where you’ve been through clothing that you’ve worn. I want products that are going to endure. I hate that we buy things that are disposable. We need to buy products with integrity.”

Here’s the theory on pattern-on-pattern dressing. Men are likely to wear a pattern in their suit, shirt, tie, and handkerchief, and if all of those are of different scales—the check is a half centimeter, the stripe on the shirt is a centimeter, the stripe on your ties is two centimeters, et cetera—it all works. If the patterns are the same scale, it never works. Look at the Duke of Windsor, who was a great pattern wearer. He never wears the same scale of pattern.”

I actually don’t care how people dress. I just want people to be interesting.”

Source: details.com

Photo Source: faz.net

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artcomesfirst:

In the latest episode of Ask The Experts we get five different perspectives on the menswear mainstay, the suit. Here, the founders of Art Comes First (Sam Lambert & Shaka Maidoh) reflect on the origins of their style, and discuss how men can inject a little personality into their own look.

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iqfashion:

What do you recommend men to consider when getting items for their Autumn/Winter wardrobes?
Patrick Grant:
"For me I dress very simply and what I do have in my wardrobe are good things which I keep going back to. You can’t go wrong with hefty overcoats in good heavy wool in a selection of lengths and weights.
But with certain staples, the same rules apply – get a few good things and you wont go wrong. Don’t buy five pairs of poor quality shoes, buy one or two really good ones. In all your clothes selection, get great high quality simple materials that will last and age well.
Hats are always good in the winter too. Not a cloth cap but a felt fedora – but give it a good bash so it doesn’t feel too formal. Sit on it a few times and roll it up and stuff it in your pocket. I think in the winter especially, that crisp pristine look looks a bit inappropriate.”

iqfashion:

What do you recommend men to consider when getting items for their Autumn/Winter wardrobes?

Patrick Grant:

"For me I dress very simply and what I do have in my wardrobe are good things which I keep going back to. You can’t go wrong with hefty overcoats in good heavy wool in a selection of lengths and weights.

But with certain staples, the same rules apply – get a few good things and you wont go wrong. Don’t buy five pairs of poor quality shoes, buy one or two really good ones. In all your clothes selection, get great high quality simple materials that will last and age well.

Hats are always good in the winter too. Not a cloth cap but a felt fedora – but give it a good bash so it doesn’t feel too formal. Sit on it a few times and roll it up and stuff it in your pocket. I think in the winter especially, that crisp pristine look looks a bit inappropriate.”

Continue reading ]

putthison:

Real People: Layering Lengths

The ideal men’s casual ensemble, as etched into stone tablets handed down to Steve McQueen by a god resembling On the Waterfront-era Marlon Brando, involves straight or slightly tapered pants worn a little below the waist with a slight break at the hem, sneakers or leather boots, a shirt or tshirt either tucked or untucked and ending just below the beltline, and a jacket that’s just a little longer. These are the commandments of flattering proportions in layering.

But the geometry of good layering is more complicated than that. Adrian in DC's photos often show off a sophisticated sense of proportion and length that just slightly subverts the military/sportswear styles from which most of our casual dressing norms derive. In the top photo, Adrian's midlayer denim is shorter than his shirt, and not just a little bit. In the lower left, he layers a shorter jersey tee over a longer one. The lower right photo's layers are not as unusual, but maintain the “A”-shaped silhouette that literally inverts the traditional, shoulder-emphasizing “V” of most western men's clothing. Making sure it doesn't look like an accident is key—note Adrian's shirt sleeve length is precise and the colors he's wearing are basic but complementary, not mismatched or sloppy. It's not generally advisable to mimic directly a brand's lookbook or runway show, which after all are primarily marketing tools rather than how-to guides, but Engineered Garments fall 2011 book and Siki Im’s work were some of the places I initially saw layering like this and thought it looked good—both lines use a lot of sportswear elements but aren’t afraid of aprons or tunics as layers. I don’t yet have any recommendations for a best value tunic.

-Pete

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Holy sale Batman

Jos. A. Bank had a huge sale last week with 70% off many items. Shirts that were once $129 were marked down to $19 on their clearance section too.

With starting a new job, this was right on time. Expect more pictures in the near future. 

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